In comparison to the European winter Australia has mild temperatures but it also does get cold and damp especially in the evenings and mornings.

Because of the Ayurvedic rule that  ‘like attracts like’ in the winter season Kapha and Vata dosha are likely to aggravate and often result in weight gain, depression, cough and cold, sinusitis etc.

To stay healthy it is recommended to have an Ayurvedic consultation to plan a tailored program to suit your individual needs to stay healthy so you are able to enjoy this season.

A few tips below to stay balanced:

Favour a warm, nourishing diet to pacify Vata without aggravating Kapha

We’re designed to eat a little bit more in winter. However, it must be the right types of foods to nurture whilst minimising congestion. Rice, barley, rye, healthy oils (ghee, linseed, avocado, hemp, olive), and seasonal root vegetables in soups and stews are all recommended.

Avoid Vata aggravating non-seasonal food, such as salads and raw food in general. Avoid refrigerated water, lukewarm water aids in digestion.

Have a warm breakfast (porridge with a sprinkle of Kapha churna and honey is excellent), steamed vegetables, rice with a little ghee for lunch and at night time try some hot milk with warming spices such as ginger, cinnamon or cardamon.

Try some Lemongrass Tea

Ingredients: 4 glasses of water, 6-10 leaves of lemon grass, 1/4 tsp grounded pepper powder, a pinch of grated ginger , 1 pinch of turmeric powder

  • Boil the lemon grass in 4 cups of water
  • add pepper powder and crushed ginger and turmeric
  • let it steep for 2-3 minutes
  • optional: add natural sweetener

Stay warm

An Ayurvedic oil massage followed by a herbal steam is excellent to ward off the cold or ground yourself with a daily self-massage with a warm black sesame seed oil followed by a warm shower/ bath to prevent feelings of coldness, and stiff, aching joints. Use aromatherapy oils that are warm, pungent and uplifting such as camphor, cinnamon, cloves, cedar and frankincense.

Favour clothes which are bright, cheery colours, such as reds and oranges. Finally, always wear a hat outside as 60% of body heat is lost through the head.

Excercise

Avoid day sleeping as this will diminish your digestive fire and will make you feel heavy and sluggish.

Be up by 6.30-7am at the latest and to do some vigorous exercise to get the lymph moving preventing congestion. Some Sun Salutations are ideal as they build up heat and work all the major muscles

Ayurvedic herbal supplements / winter essentials

  1. Chyavanprash, Amalaki Rasayana and Ashwagandhaleha  are ideal over the winter month and will help to strengthen the lungs and boost the body’s immune system – preventing cough and colds.
  2. To help you get over a cough Sitopladi churna is a wonderful Ayurvedic formulation which is also liked and suited for children.
  3. Kapha and Vata churna – a warming spice mix which can be added to your meals.
  4. Vata taila, Kapha taila, black sesame oil – are wonderful oils to use for your daily self massage at home.
  5. Amalaki/ Indian gooseberry is the best source of Vitamin C and mostly beneficial during this season
  6. Try a stimulating Kapha tea in the morning and a Vata tea in the afternoon

For more information on winter health please contact info@lakshmiayurveda.com.au or call Karin: 0406810547

 

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often impairs the sufferers motor skills, speech and other functions. It belongs to a group of conditions called movement disorders and it develops from a loss of dopamine producing cells.  

Parkinson’s distinct triad of symptoms are

  1. Bradykinsesia (slow physical movement)
  2. Rigidity – muscle stiffness can occur in any part of the body
  3. Tremor/ shaking – often occurs when the hand is at rest

In Ayurveda Parkinson’s disease known as Kampavata or Vephatu and is considered to be a Vataja nanatmaja Vyadhi (diease of Vata). Kampavata can be translated as tremors due to Vata.

Reference from Madhava Nidana 22: 74

The whole body or head, hands, legs get tremors. This is called vepathu or kampa. This causes difficulty in movements and walking.

In the time of Charaka and Sushruta a cluster of symptoms (sanskrit words below) are described which can be seen as a description of Parkinson’s disease.

Kampa = tremor

Sirakampa = head tremor

Stambha = rigidity

Cestasana = bradykinesia

Vakvikrti = disturbance in speech

Bhudhikshaya = cognitive impairment. depression, anxiety, change in mood

Nidranasha = sleep disturbance

The Ayurvedic treatment approach will involve Vata and Kapha reducing measures with diet , and herbs (e.g. Kapikaccu churna, Rasona,Ashwagandha and Bala churnam) and external treatment.

External therapies are:

Abhyangam (oil  massage)

Svedana (herbal steam)

Shirodhara

Patra Potali svedam (special prepared bolus of medicinal leaves)

Pizhichil (pouring medicated oil in a specific manner over the body)

Thalam (applying medicines over the centre of the head)

Udvarthanam (powder massge)

Basti (Anuvasanam = a type of medicated enema)

Nasya (administration of nasal drops)

Rasayana (rejuvenation treatment)

For more information or interest in a consultation please email: info@lakshmiayurveda.com.au

AoLBrochure
Part One – 3 day course
26th to 28th of August in Perth
for more information please see the attached brochure or contact Karin info@lakshmiayurveda.com.au

“It is every human being’s birthright to live
in a disease free body and a stress free mind.
Yet, neither at school nor at home have we been
taught how to deal with our negative emotions.”
Sri Sri Ravi Shankar

During the workshop you will learn about the Sudarshan Kriya a unique breathing technique, yoga, relaxation and meditation. At the end of the course you will be equipped to practice at home

There will also be a talk about a wholesome Ayurvedic diet which is presented by Lakshmi Ayurveda on Sunday 28th of August at 2.30pm.

Sudarshan Kriya is one of the most comprehensive breathing techniques derived from the yogic science of breath and taught by the Art of Living Foundation. It is traditionally understood to use specific rhythms of get klonopin online the breath to eliminate stress, support the various organs and systems within the body, transform overpowering emotions and restore peace of mind. According to the yogic science of breath, impurities which accumulate in the cells
cause sluggishness and promote disease. The Sudarshan Kriya oxygenates the cells and rapidly flushes out impurities. Physically, the cells are vitalised; emotionally one feels a sense of balance and contentment.


Food equals Life – The body is the product of food

And he knew that food was Brahman
From food all beings are born
by food they live and into food they return
Upanishad 3.2

Ahara/ Food has been worshipped since ancient times as the giver and sustainer of life
A statement by Charaka ”the self controlled man can life for a hundred years free from disease through the intake of hita ahara/ wholesome diet.
In Ayurveda the physical body is called Kaya. The sanskrit word Kaya can be translated that the body is a build up of food.
Already 5000 years ago Ayurveda has recognised that the body is the result or an outcome of the food we eat.

Food can be the cause (nidana) of a disease
Food can be the treatment (chikitsa) of a disease

Wholesome food and drinks have good colour, smell, taste and are pleasing to the senses and conducive to health, if taken in accordance with the ayurvedic rules.
According to Ayurveda – complexion, clarity, good voice, longevity, happiness, satisfaction, nourishment, mental/ physical strength and intellect are all conditioned by food.

Ayurveda recognises six different tastes

1.MADHURA/ SWEET
2.AMLA/SOUR
3.LAVANA/SALTY
4.KATU/ HOT
5.TIKTA/BITTER
6.KASAYA/ ASTRINGENT

The six different taste are important and should be present in the daily diet. The different rasa/ taste can be used to bring equilibrium to the doshas (Vata, Pitta, Kapha).

Some of the Ayurvedic rules for food intake:
1. Intake of food should be warm
2. Food should be unctuous
3. Food should be in proper quantity
4. Intake of food should only be after digestion of the previous meal
5. The food should not have contradictory potencies e.g sour and sweet food such as fruit and milk
6. Intake of food should be in a proper place and seated
7. Intake of food should be without hurry or worry
8. Intake of food should not be too fast or too slow
9. One should take the food while not talking or laughing

Want to know your body constitution and see what foods and taste is most beneficial for you.
You are welcome for a consultation at Lakshmi Ayurveda
Consultation price: 90 minutes ($85)
Private Health fund rebate!
For bookings call Karin 0406810547

Food Prayer

Brahmaapanam Brahmahavir Brahmaagnau Brahmanaahutam
Brahmaivatena Gantavyam Brahmakarma Samaadhinaa

Aham Vaishvanaro Bhootvaa Praaninaam Dehamaashritah
Praanapaana Samaayuktah Pachaamyannam Chaturvidham

Om Shanti Shanti Shanti
Bhagavad Gita Ch. 4 verse 24

The act of offering is Brahman. The offering itself is Brahman. The offering is done by Brahman in the sacred fire which is Brahman. He alone attains Brahman who, in all actions, is fully absorbed in Brahman.

“I am Vaishnavara, existing as fire God in the bodies of living beings. Being associated with ingoing and outgoing life breaths, I will digest all the four different types of food
and purify them.”

Chyawanaprash is an inspiring formulation. Since its known inception dating back to 1500 BC to the present age, it has remained one of the most popular and well known ayurvedic formulations. Chyawanaprash manifests the entire human quest for immortality and freedom from disease and prevention of ageing. The formulation as a whole is an expression of a blessing from the Rigveda `jeevema shardah shatam´.
The word Chywanaprash is composed of two words chyawana and prasha. The former, stands for the name of a sage and prasha denotes a drug or diet which is suitable for ingestion. Chyawanaprash is outstanding and Charaka has listed it among the foremost formulations listed in chapter one of the Chikitsasthana.

Chyawanaprash is the superior of all rasayana formulations. Rasayana is the seventh branch of Ayurveda which deals with the prevention of aging, disease and minimization of degenerative processes and aiming to prolong life. It covers the three modern medical branches of immunology, metabolism and endocrinology.
Directions for use: Take 1-2tsp daily, followed by warm water/milk/ herbal tea

Benefits and uses:
• Preserves youth and slows down ageing
• counters debilitating and ageing disorders
• strengthens the immune system
• excellent rejuvenator for body and mind
• it purifies and develops the seven body tissues (dhatus)
• best all round elixir

Organic Chyavanprash 250 gm $22

Mythology of Chyawanaprash
According to Mahabharata
Puloma the wife of Bhrigu was at home by herself when a monster entered the heritage and tried to ravish her. Puloma was pregnant at that time and out of fear and anxiety, she aborted and the baby boy was born prematurely. He was named Chyawana and due to the premature birth, he was physically very weak. In his later life he was getting married to King Sharyatis´ young and beautiful daughter Sunkanya. Sometime after the marriage, the Ashwini twins offered him a medicine to regain his youth so he could be happy with his young beautiful wife Sunkanya. After taking the medicine Chyawana regained his youth and the formulation was named Chyawanaprash after the name of Chyawana.

Traditional Organic Ghee 200gm – $18.90

How to use ghee:
Add ghee to your cooking, it is viewed as a superior cooking fat as it doesnt burn during cooking or digestion. According to Indian tadition, ghee, when fried with spices, takes on the properties of those spices and diffuses them throughout the food (yogavahi).
Herbs can be added to the ghee to enhance their healing effects

Some health benefits of Ghee according to Ayurveda
+ promotes learning and memory
+ anti aging
+ balances excess stomach acid
+ increases fertility
+ vitalising and rejuvenating
+ good for eye sight, complexion, voice and beauty

Quote from the Charaka Samhita
“Intake of ghee is prescribed for those whose bodily constitution is dominated by vata and pitta, who is suffering from diseases due to the vitiation by vata and pitta, those desirous of good eye sight, those suffering from phthisis and consumption, the old, children, the weak, those desirous of longevity, those desirous of strength, good complexion, voice, nourishment, progeny, tenderness, lustre, ojas, memory, intelligence, power of digestion, wisdom, proper functioning of sense organs and those afflicted with injuries due to burns, by weapons, poisons and fire” (Charaka Samhita Su 13/14; Ch Su 13/ 41-43).

How to make your own ghee
Preparing Ghee, from Diet and Nutrition: Himalayan Mountain Cookery (Himalayan Institue)
To make ghee, place one pound of unsalted butter in a saucepan until it boils; then lower the heat. When the white foam of milk solids which will accumulate on the top begins to collapse and thicken, start skimming it off. Do not disturb the bottom of the pan, as some of these solids will also sink and can be left in the pot until after the ghee is poured off. As the butter continues to boil, watch the oily portion to see when it becomes clear, and watch the sediment on the bottom to see when it turns a golden brown. Be careful this does not scorch and ruin the ghee. When all the water is evaporated, the sound of the cooking will change from one of boiling to one of frying, and the bubbling will stop. When only the clear, hissing oil and the golden sediment remain, the ghee is ready. At this point the temperature will begin to rise quickly so remove the pan from the heat, and let it sit for a moment. During this time, the hot fat will turn the sediment a little darker. Pour the ghee off into an earthenware, glass or metal container for use near the stove.